Interesting happenings in the Container world – Part 2

Another round of updates on the container world.. – new features, runtimes, orchestration engine etc.

CoreOS announced new release of Rocket and the App Container spec.  There is also a new app container runtime, Nose Cone, implementing the App container spec. There are other implementations as well, like Jet Pack and libappc. You can read more here – https://coreos.com/blog/rocket-and-appc-0.3.1/

In my opinion, this is good in general from ecosystem point of view. However, this make things a bit challenging for the the end customers. There will be interoperability and migration related issues. It would be interesting to see how the various runtimes will handle interoperability and migration from one runtime to another.

There are interesting happenings in the Windows container world. DH2i released a container management software for Windows, which is first of a kind for Windows environment. It provides core container technology coupled with advanced management, automation and orchestration capabilities. Pretty interesting and useful addition for Windows environment. You can read more here – http://dh2i.com/press/dh2i-launches-first-container-management-software-microsoft-windows-server-mid-enterprise-class-applications-workloads/

As of now, DH2i is a Windows only solution. Consequently, for mixed Windows and Linux environments there is still a gap w.r.to unified container management solution.

Docker released version 1.5.0 with some cool features – notably IPv6 support, container stats api, read-only containers and ability to specify a custom file to be used for building docker images, instead of the default Dockerfile. You can read more here – http://blog.docker.com/2015/02/docker-1-5-ipv6-support-read-only-containers-stats-named-dockerfiles-and-more/

Logentries has already provided a docker container image, leveraging the new stats api. It’s really useful.

A brief note on the read-only file system support for docker container:

This basically mounts the container’s root file system as read-only. This when used with ‘volumes’ functionality forces, any process within the container to write only to the mounted ‘volumes’ .This ensures persistence and allows sharing of the data, say for centralized logging.

Currently containers is one of the most happening things in the tech world. Stay tuned for more updates..

Pradipta Kumar Banerjee

I'm a Cloud and Linux/ OpenSource enthusiast, with 16 years of industry experience at IBM. You can find more details about me here - Linkedin

You may also like...